Information overload – what’s your best learning style?

Do YOU have information overload when it comes to choosing which way you learn?

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You can’t have failed to notice that I like to talk a lot about the benefits of using intelligent transcription and how it can help individuals and small businesses make more of their online audio or video content. Your content is valuable and it stands to reason that you’d like to make it even more valuable by turning existing words into new content, such as blog posts, social media posts, online articles and e-books.

But what about online courses and learning information?

Do you buy online courses? Perhaps you create and sell them yourself as part of your business or perhaps you’re thinking about it (in spite of the whole hooha over the new VAT rules due to come in on 1st January, but that’s another story altogether!).

Over the last couple of years I have been a prodigious browser of courses available to buy at the click of a button, and have even bought a few. It’s enough to make your head spin sometimes, there are so many available, and it’s hard to know where to start.

What would make you choose one course over another?

The cost? The blurb on the sales page? Testimonials from satisfied customers?

Content that’s accessible for your own personal learning style, perhaps?!

Things like cost and recommendations are extremely important, of course, but I often wonder if people stop to consider the implications of what’s involved in accessing the course content before they click on the old Paypal button. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t mean that there’s anything wrong with the content at all, but I often wonder if buyers of online courses think about how they prefer to access learning material before they buy a course.

I wonder too if businesses that produce online courses are missing a trick when it comes to making their content more accessible to more people.

As mentioned above, I have bought a few courses since the start of 2013 and I’m afraid to admit that (whispers), I haven’t finished all of them. Now, this could be down to various reasons, namely procrastination (horrors!), lack of time, not managing my time properly (cough) and that old chestnut, just not getting round to it. Perhaps you’re in a similar boat!

I’ve realised that I actually prefer to READ my learning material. I have to be in the right mood to listen to or watch a webinar, and I will admit that I’m easily distracted by other things on the computer whilst they’re running. But give me a book and a comfy sofa, and my focus is only in one place.

You might now be able to guess where this thread is heading!

I think it’s always worth considering how your customers are likely to access their learning materials, and provide the content accordingly. If this means providing an intelligent transcript of the audio of a set of webinars or videos, then I really do believe you’ll be adding a lot of extra value to what you’re offering.

What do you think? I’d love to know how you like to access your content online, so please either leave a comment, or pop over to my Facebook page and let me know.

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More on the pesky problem of spelling and punctuation…

Anybody who happens to see my Facebook posts on a regular basis won’t have failed to notice that I’m a bit of a pedant when it comes to spelling and punctuation. I have talked about the whole issue of apostrophes elsewhere, and I think it’s time to expand on this a wee bit!

If you run a business or if you’re starting to think about it, it stands to reason that you want all your business bits and bobs like your website, your business cards and your social media pages to look tip top. You want to come across as professional and trustworthy without losing sight of your own individuality, so what you’re aiming for is to create an eye catching personal brand, and it goes without saying that you probably want to spend a bit of time working on what you want to say to get the customers flocking in.

Unfortunately it can be very easy to spoil the effect of a lovely website or sales page with a few pesky old spelling and punctuation or grammar mistakes.

Here’s a selection of some of my favourites and a few hints and tips on how to correct the errors.

Although I’ve covered this before, I think the dreaded misplaced apostrophe deserves a recap, and it’s most commonly used in a plural where it is not needed.

To give you an example, how about book’s. The plural of book is books. The only time you need an apostrophe is if you plan to write something like, ‘The book’s an excellent read’ (short for ‘the book is an excellent read’) or ‘The book’s contents’. If you have several books, you might say something like, ‘The books’ covers were all shiny’.  The apostrophe always goes at the end if it’s the possessive of a plural.

Continuing on the subject of apostrophes, it’s is short for it is, where its is a possessive, e.g. ‘the tree has lost its leaves’.

Confusion is common when it comes to your/you’re and they’re/there/their.

You’re is the contraction of you are and your is a pronoun, e.g. ‘you’re going shopping later’ or ‘your mum’s going shopping later’.

They’re is the contraction of they are.

There can be used in a sentence with a verb e.g. there is a bird in the sky.

Their indicates possession, e.g. their house is lovely.

Not to mention the use of should of instead of should’ve (the contraction of should have).

Moving on, what about words that sound the same but have different spellings?

A few examples are…

Accept/except. Stationery/stationary. Affect/effect. Compliment/complement. Principle/ principal.

I accept your apology for eating the chocolate, even though there is nothing left for me in the fridge except cheese.

I bought some stationery before I went to catch the train, which was already stationary at the platform.

She knew how to affect him, and the overall effect was spellbinding.

Her friend gave her a compliment on the beautiful shoes that complemented her dress.

He refused to change his mind as it would be against his principles, despite being confronted by the principal person in charge.

Even pedantic people like me can be guilty of slip-ups – have you ever found yourself looking at a word for so long that it starts to look wrong?

Yup, me too.

The moral of the story is, if you’ve got important words out there that you want other people to take seriously, always get someone else to proofread them before hitting publish!